Chew On This, Six Dental Myths Debunked

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/196999.php?sr&trendmd-shared=0 Brushing, flossing, and twice-yearly dental check-ups are standard for oral health care, but there are more health benefits to taking care of your pearly whites than most of us know. In a review article, a faculty member at Tufts University School of Dental Medicine (TUSDM) debunks common dental myths and outlines how diet and nutritionaffects…

Maternal chronic stress linked to more dental cavities in children

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150918080631.htm Chronic maternal stress, when measured by biological markers, has been found for the first time to be associated with a higher prevalence of cavities among children, according to a study by King’s College London and University of Washington. Chronic stress was also found to be linked to lower probabilities of breast feeding and dental…

Regrow a tooth? Fish, yes; humans, maybe some day

Source: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/10/151019154108.htm When a Lake Malawi cichlid loses a tooth, a new one drops neatly into place as a replacement. Why can’t humans similarly regrow teeth lost to injury or disease? Working with hundreds of these colorful fish, researchers are beginning to understanding how the animals maintain their hundreds of teeth throughout their adult lives. By…

What is gingivitis? What causes gingivitis?

Source: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/241721.php Gingivitis means inflammation of the gums (gingiva). It commonly occurs because of films of bacteria that accumulate on the teeth – plaque; this type is called plaque-induced gingivitis. Gingivitis is a non-destructive type of periodontal disease. If left untreated, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis, which is more serious and can eventually lead to loss of teeth. A patient with gingivitis will…

How bacteria-fighting 3-D-printed teeth could affect dentistry

Source: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/innovations/wp/2015/10/20/how-bacteria-fighting-3d-printed-teeth-could-impact-dentistry/ The latest 3-D printing innovation could change the way you think about your annual visit to the dentist. That’s because Dutch researchers at the University of Groningen are working on the creation of a 3-D-printed tooth made of an antimicrobial plastic that kills the type of bacteria responsible for tooth decay on contact. Imagine teeth that…

Beyond Tooth Decay

Most of us are aware that poor dental hygiene can lead to tooth decay, gum disease and bad breath – but not brushing your teeth could also have consequences for more serious illnesses. In this spotlight feature, to coincide with National Dental Hygiene Month, we peer beneath the plaque to investigate what other – perhaps…